English 353 : Women and the Contemporary Novel

I’m excited to be teaching Women and the Contemporary Novel this summer at MSU. This is an upper-level English course (cross-listed with Women’s Studies), and I’m excited to dive (back) in to some of my favorite recent books with a group of students. The course will be online, and I’m experimenting with using Slack as our primary mode of communication.  Course description below!

I’m especially excited to work with Book of the Month in this course. Students will subscribe to the rebooted monthly service, and we’ll vote on our final read. This will be a great way to discuss commercial literature, and participate in some of the online communities that BOTM has been cultivating over the past two years.

Meanwhile, I’ll be writing my next dissertation chapter (also on Book of the Month). Which will be great fun.

Women and the Contemporary Novel

Description: How are women writers shaping the contemporary novel? What topics, themes, or styles typify contemporary novels written by women? How are women authors and their works marketed, discussed, and celebrated? During this summer course, we will read five (fabulous) books, all published after 2010, that represent a number of trends in contemporary literature—global literature, literature in translation, auto-fiction, upmarket fiction, and commercial fiction—that reflect on both the changing form of the novel and intersectional feminisms in the 21st century. In addition, we will consider communities of female authorship and criticism made possible through popular online communities such as The Hairpin, Rookie, The Toast, and Avidly, as well as private Facebook groups like Pantsuit Nation. We will utilize Slack for informal discussion, but by virtue of the online format, our course will be reading-heavy and interaction-lite. Assignments include a.) weekly short vlogs/blogs, b.) a creative piece or review essay, and c.) a 10-page paper.

 

Texts (in order)

  • Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2013) ISBN: 978-0307455925
  • My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante (2012) ISBN: 978-1609450786
  • The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson (2015) ISBN: 978-1555977351
  • Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (2014) ISBN: 978-0804172448
  • And one final text from the Book of the Month June selections, chosen by class vote.

 

 

 

MLA 2017: Digital Holland and Community-Based DH

I’m happy to announce that my paper, “Digital Holland and Community-Based DH,” has been accepted to MLA! This panel, “Local Digital Humanities” is organized by the MLA Forum on Digital Humanities. I’m excited to be sharing my work at Hope College– and, more importantly, the work of undergraduate Mellon Scholars.

Paper Abstract

Digital humanities has been celebrated for its emphasis on collaborative research. Yet DH’s transformative collaborative ethos is restricted to institutional spaces—within the university, between universities, or in formal academic communities—and at large research universities. This paper is interested in collaboration of a different sort and in different places, considering the role of the local community in the digital research program of the small liberal arts college, arguing for a model of Community-Based DH. Literature in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning has emphasized Community-Based learning as a hallmark of “high-impact” education, encouraging classrooms to expand beyond their institutional havens (Kuh, 2008). Digital humanities research lends itself, especially, to these pedagogical practices, expanding the reach of collaboration into the local community—work that small liberal arts colleges are especially equipped to undertake. To make this case, I rely on my own community, university, and students. As the Mellon Fellow for Digital Liberal Arts at Hope College (Holland, MI), I oversee a robust partnership between local partners (archives, historical associations, churches) and diligent undergraduate researchers. Our flagship research project, Digital Holland, has been running for four years; students have been partnering with local organizations and independent researchers to make Holland’s cultural heritage freely available and accessible to the public in the form of digital archives and exhibits. In addition, students have also developed a series of “turnkey” projects to make digital research methods accessible to the public, inviting community members to participate in the making of Digital Holland, partnering in the act of knowledge creation alongside student project managers. In placing the discourse of Community-Based learning in conversation with DH Pedagogy, I hope to transform both: reframing the local community as more than simply a site, object of study, or recipient of service, but as a partner in research, and by expanding the traditional models of the DH Lab or Center to consider the applications of digital research and scholarship for the public good.